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Southeast Asia Events February – November 2013

Posted On 2013 Feb 02
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Presentations, Conferences, Performances, Festivals, and More…

(Films and Exhibitions Below)

(www.international.ucla.edu)

Saturday, February 2, 2013
From Prosecution to Empowerment: Fighting Trafficking and Promoting the Rights of Migrants

8:00 AM – 5:00 P.M.

Davidson Conference Center

University of Southern California

3415 South Figueroa Street

Los Angeles, CA 90089-0871

(213) 740-5956

Web announcement and RSVP dornsife.usc.edu/conferences/from-prosecution-to-empowerment/

There is a $20 registration fee that can be waived, especially for students, if they email “Jackie Agnello” jagnello@usc.edu, orcsii@usc.edu.

Human trafficking is a dire problem that thus far has generated shortsighted and lopsided solutions. Not only is there limited research about trafficking – as noted by the U.S. Government Accountability Office, the information advanced by the U.S. government and media is not usually based on rigorous research– the movement against it has also not developed collaborative relationships with other related struggles in order to deepen and broaden our understanding of this complex problem. Moreover, often government resources and humanitarian aid that go into the war on trafficking are not directed towards the vital empowerment of labor migrants and the reduction of their vulnerability to trafficking.

From Prosecution to Empowerment aims to contribute to connecting the fight on human trafficking with broader movements to empower migrant laborers. Its aims are to address how the war on trafficking can be a vehicle for promoting the human and worker rights of migrants, how to reduce their vulnerability to abuse, and how to empower them in the process of labor migration.

This conference is organized, hosted and sponsored by: USC Center for Feminist Research, USC Center for the Study of Immigrant Integration (CSII), and USC Department of Sociology.

 

Wednesday, February 6, 2013
The Politics of Humor: A Historical Perspective of the Vessantara Jataka in Thailand

12:00 PM – 1:30 PM

10383 Bunche Hall

UCLA Campus

Free and open to the public.

Web announcement here.

The Vessantara Jataka is the most famous of all the folktales about the previous lives of the Buddha.  This talk highlights significant variations in both interpretations and performances of the Vessantara Jataka across three regions of Thailand.

Katherine Bowie is Professor of Anthropology and current Director of the Center for Southeast Asian Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  She has lived in Thailand eight years.  An expert in village life, her research combines oral histories, participant-observation and interviews with archival sources.

 Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Southeast Asian Studies and the Center for Buddhist Studies.

Wednesday, February 13, 2013
Beyond Queering the Chain of Care: Affective Feminizations, Biological Investments

4:00 PM – 6:00 PM

306 Royce Hall

UCLA Campus

Free and open to the public.

Web announcement here.

Colloquium with Aren Z. Aizura, Rutgers University, New Brunswick

Martin Manalansan observed in 2007 that we need to “queer” the chain of care—by which he meant transnational care work economies that naturalize and undervalue the labors of women of color. Not only women are subject to transnational care work economies. But what are the implications of this observation? What forms of racialized gendering enable all kinds of bodies to perform queered affective labors? What gendered, sexual and racialized social relations are taking shape through such affective labour practices? Grounded in research on the labors of gender reassignment clinic care workers in South East Asia, this paper reads theories of orientalism and self-orientalism, affective labour and biopolitical subjectivity to provoke affective labor theory to “queer” itself. This paper contributes to a growing dialogue between transgender studies, theories of transnational care work, and the study of sexuality, gender, and labor in South East Asia.

Aren Z. Aizura is Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in the the Department of Gender and Women’s Studies and the Institute for Research on Women at Rutgers University, New Brunswick.

Co-sponsored by the UCLA Department of Asian American Studies, the Center for Southeast Asian Studies, the Center for the Study of Women, and the Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Campus Resource Center.

Wednesday, February 20, 2013
Subnational Islamization through Secular Parties:
Comparing Shari’a Politics in Two Indonesian Provinces

Wednesday, February 20, 2013

3:00 PM – 4:30 PM

10383 Bunche Hall

UCLA Campus

Los Angeles, CA 90095

Free and open to the public.

Web announcement here.

Colloquium with Michael Buehler, Department of Political Science, Northern Illinois University.

The Arab Spring has reinvigorated debate about the influence of Islamic activism on politics in democratizing Muslim countries, particularly the adoption of Islamic law (shari’a). Most studies emphasize the causal primacy of Islamist parties in shari’apolicymaking. Yet, the determination of policy agendas is almost never under the absolute control of one group. This is especially true for democratizing, Muslim-majority countries where decades of authoritarian rule have allowed secular elites to become deeply entrenched in state institutions. Based on field research in Indonesia, I argue that the state mediates the influence of Islamist groups in shari’a policymaking.

Michael Buehler (Ph.D., The London School of Economics and Political Science) is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science and a Faculty Associate at the Center for Southeast Asian Studies at Northern Illinois University. Specializing in Comparative Politics, his teaching and research interests evolve around state-society relations under conditions of democratization and decentralization. He is particularly interested in state-civil society relations, the relationship between party systems and social movements as well as state-religion relations.

Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Southeast Asian Studies.

Friday, February 22, 2013
Treacherous Subjects: Gender, Culture and Trans-Vietnamese Feminism

12:00 noon – 1:30 p.m.

10383 Bunche Hall

UCLA Campus

Los Angeles, CA  90095

Web announcement here.

Free and open to the public.

Book talk by Prof. Lan P. Duong, Media and Cultural Studies Department, University of California, Riverside

The newly-released book, Treacherous Subjects: Gender, Culture and Trans-Vietnamese Feminism (Temple University Press, 2012), examines the postwar films and literature of the Vietnamese and diasporic communities in the United States and France. The book pivots on collaboration’s dual meaning as a collective artistic endeavor or a political act of treason. Reading across three national contexts, the book situates the cultural productions of the Vietnamese and Vietnamese diaspora within a historical context of collaboration. Based on this vexed history, Treacherous Subjects delves into the cultural politics of collaboration to challenge the braided ideology of heterosexist patriarchy and nationalism that underlie denunciations or celebrations of collaborative acts. Decentering nationalist notions of loyalty and collaboration, Treacherous Subjects asserts that in collaboration lay the grounds for a feminist mode of analysis the book names trans-Vietnamese feminism.

Lan P. Duong is Associate Professor in the Media and Cultural Studies Department at UC Riverside. Dr. Duong’s second book project, “Transnational Vietnamese Cinemas: Imagining Nationhood in a Globalized Era,” examines Vietnamese cinema from its inception to the present-day. Her research interests include feminist film theory, postcolonial literature, and Asian/American film and literature.

Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Southeast Asian Studies, Center for the Study of Women, Department of Gender Studies, Asian American Studies Department.

Sunday, February 24, 2013
Authors on Asia: Some Last People and Cambodia Angkor

2:00 pm

Pacific Asia Museum

46 North Los Robles Avenue

Pasadena, California 91101

(626) 449-2742

RSVP to 626-449-2742 ext. 20.

$9 for General Admission; $7 for Students and Seniors; Free for Children Ages 11 and Under; Free for Members

Website: www.pacificasiamuseum.org/index.aspx

The Silk Road was once one of the world’s most significant commercial arteries spanning the entire length of Asia. Explorer and photographer Pierre Odier will speak on his re-tracing of  Marco Polo’s route using modern Land Rovers instead of camels, on an adventure that covered 20,000 kilometers in 85 days. Odier’s Some Last People: Vanishing Tribes of Bhutan, China, Mexico, Mongolia and Siberia and Cambodia Angkor: A Lasting Legacy will be available for purchase and signing.

Thursday, February 28, 2013
Come On! The Politics of Contemporary Visual Art in Cambodia, Viet Nam and Beyond

3:00 – 4:30 PM

2100A Broad Hall

UCLA Campus

Free and open to the public.

Web announcement here.

A talk by artist, curator and writer Viet Lê, Assistant Professor, Visual Studies | Visual and Critical Studies, California College of the Arts, San Francisco

“Why Have There Been No Great Vietnamese Artists?” art historian Nora Taylor asks in her provocative essay.  This talk further reconsiders the links between power, art, politics, and prejudice. Viet Lê queeries the strategies “local” and “diasporic” Khmer and Vietnamese artists and organizers use in a global art market. He also shares his projects as a curator, artist and researcher dealing with sexuality, modernity, and trauma in the interstices of Phnom Penh, Sài Gòn, Los Angeles, Seoul and Taipei.

Viet Lê’s work deals with popular visual culture, historical trauma, and modernity in Southeast Asia and its diasporas, particularly Viet Nam and Cambodia.

Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Southeast Asian Studies.

Wednesday, March 6, 2013
Re-Membering the Khmer Rouge: Cambodian American Memory Work

12:00 PM – 1:30 PM

10383 Bunche Hall

UCLA Campus

Free and open to the public.

Web announcement here.

Book talk by Cathy Schlund-Vials, University of Connecticut

Between 1975 and 1979, under the rule of the Khmer Rouge, it is estimated that 1.7 million Cambodians died as a result of execution, starvation, and forced labor, constituting roughly 21% to 25% of the extant population. Now in 2012, this history of genocide – commonly referred to as the period of “The Killing Fields” for those outside Cambodia – remains contested and unresolved. Despite the formation of a U.N/War Crimes Tribunal and the indictment of five Khmer Rouge leaders, only one person has been sentenced for crimes against humanity. Hence, though more than thirty years has passed since the deposal of the Khmer Rouge from power, justice has yet to be served in an international court.

The legacy of the genocide, the absence of state-sanctioned justice, and the memory of “the Killing Fields” are primary reference points for this talk, which examines the ways in which Cambodian American cultural production is rooted in political and politicized projects of genocidal remembrance.

Co-sponsored by the UCLA Center for Southeast Asian Studies, Asian American Studies Center, Asian American Studies Department, Young Research Library Oral History Project, and Southeast Asian Studies programs at the University of California, Riverside, and the University of Southern California.

Sunday, March 17, 2013
Indonesia Free Family Festival

12 Noon – 4:00 PM

Pacific Asia Museum

46 North Los Robles Avenue

Pasadena, California 91101

(626) 449-2742

Website: www.pacificasiamuseum.org/index.aspx

Celebrate the beauty, art and culture of Indonesia! Enjoy the special exhibition “Marking Transitions: Ceremonial Art in Indonesia” plus demonstrations, hands-on crafts, food samples, plus traditional dances from across the nation’s more than 17,000 islands, live gamelan music and shadow puppetry.

Presented in conjunction with the Consulate General of the Republic of Indonesia.

Films

Thursday, February 21, 2013
Film Screening: “Enforcing the Silence” (Vietnam)

3:00 PM – 5:30 PM

2100A Broad Hall

UCLA Campus

Free and open to the public.

Web announcement here.

Film website: www.enforcingthesilence.com

Screening and Q&A with the filmmaker, Tony Nguyen

ENFORCING THE SILENCE explores how the Vietnam War continues in America through the tragic story of Lam Duong, the first Vietnamese reportedly to be assassinated in the U.S.

Tony Nguyen made his directorial debut with ENFORCING THE SILENCE, a feature documentary about the unsolved murder of Lam Duong, a young Vietnamese American activist. Tony co-authored a profile on Lam Duong for 101 Changemakers: Rebels and Radicals Who Changed US History, a new book in the tradition of Howard Zinn for middle school students. He is currently in post-production on GIAP AND THE LAST IRONING BOARD FACTORY, a quirky, personal film about the mother-son relationship and the last standing ironing board factory in America.

Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Southeast Asian Studies, the Department of Asian American Studies, and the Orange County-based art collective, common ground.

April 4-7 and April 11-14, 2013
Vietnamese International Film Festival (VIFF)

Irvine, Santa Ana, Los Angeles, CA

Final Schedule available in March 2013.

Volunteers are needed to assist with the Festival.  More information at www.vietfilmfest.com/volunteers.html.

Sponsored by the Vietnamese American Arts & Letters Association and UCLA’s Viet Nam Language and Culture.

Exhibitions

Through March 24, 2013
Marking Transitions: Ceremonial Art in Indonesia

Focus Gallery

Pacific Asia Museum

46 North Los Robles Avenue

Pasadena, California 91101

(626) 449-2742

Website: www.pacificasiamuseum.org/_on_view/exhibitions/2012/MarkingTransitions.aspx

Marking Transitions: Ceremonial Art in Indonesia will provide visitors a chance to experience the connections between art and ritual in the lives of Indonesians through objects created for a range of uses. Rituals remain an integral part of everyday life in many regions of Indonesia, and objects such as finely woven textiles and elegantly prepared knives carry great significance in both ceremony and performance. This exhibition will illuminate those meanings along with a focus on the extraordinary craftsmanship embedded in each object.

Through March 31, 2013
Cambodian Shop Signs from the Collection of Joel Montague

UCLA Fowler Museum

UCLA Campus

Los Angeles, CA 90095

Website: www.fowler.ucla.edu/exhibitions/fowler-focus-cambodian-shop-signs-collection-joel-montague

Under the brutal Khmer Rouge rule from 1975–79, Cambodia’s cities were systematically emptied of their population, commercial activity ground to a halt, and even the use of currency was prohibited. This genocidal reign was finally brought to an end by the occupation of Cambodia by Vietnamese military forces, who instituted a state-controlled economic system that continued to severely limit private economic activity.

Only with the implementation of the United Nations Transitional Authority in 1990 did private commercial activity begin to revive. Remarkably, Cambodia’s re-populated urban environments came alive with hand painted signs advertising myriad small businesses and personal services. Painted on sheets of metal by commercial artists in tiny makeshift studios and storefronts, the signs bore lively representations of everyday goods or services—car parts, foodstuffs, tailored clothing, medical and beauty services, musical performers, and more. Today these signs provide a window into the brief period when private enterprise bloomed but had not yet come under the sway of international business interests and mass-produced advertising.

Massachusetts-based collector Joel Montague amassed a collection of this ephemeral art in the 1990s and has recently donated this selection of twenty-two of the best hand-painted signs to the Fowler Museum.

Through November 10, 2013
The Temptation of Arjuna: A Tale of Spiritual Triumph (Indonesia)

Ahmanson Building, Level 4

Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA)

5905 Wilshire Blvd.

Los Angeles, CA 90036

No extra cost with general paid museum admission.

Web announcement: www.lacma.org/art/installation/temptation-arjuna-tale-spiritual-triumph

This exhibition showcases the recent acquisition of a rare Balinese painting from the estate of renowned Indian art historian Ananda Coomaraswamy. This exceptional Balinese painting depicts The Temptation of Arjuna, an episode from the Arjuna-Wiwaha (The Marriage of Arjuna), the eleventh-century epic poem written by Mpu Kanwa for the court of Javanese King Airlangga (1019 to 1042). The epic is based on an episode from an Old Javanese version of the Mahabharata (The Great Epic of India). The hero of the story is the powerful and spiritually-adept warrior, Arjuna, who endures a test designed by Indra, chief of the gods. The painting is a fine example of a courtly style that flourished in Bali in the village of Kamasan between the mid-nineteenth and early twentieth century. Narrative paintings depicting mythological subjects were commissioned to decorate palace pavilions for royal ceremonies and ritual festivals. The stylization of the figures in these paintings is heavily influenced by the shadow-puppet tradition known as wayang kulit,while the hand gestures and bodily postures are reminiscent of the dance drama genre known as wayang wong. The exhibition also includes a pair of batik garments from the north coast of Java from the same period.

Ongoing
Visions of Enlightenment: Understanding the Art of Buddhism

Free ONLINE exhibit presented by the Pacific Asia Museum at www.pacificasiamuseum.org/buddhism/index.htm.

Sections include:
- The Perfected One: The Buddha
- Buddhist Places
- Compassionate Beings: Bodhisattvas, Deities, Guardians, Holy Men
- Signs, Symbols, Ritual Objects

There is quite a bit of information about Buddhism in Southeast Asia, especially in the “Buddhist Places” section.

Ongoing
Intersections: World Arts/Local Lives

UCLA Fowler Museum of Cultural History
UCLA Campus
www.fowler.ucla.edu/exhibitions/intersections
Museum admission is free.  Some of the exhibit can also be viewed online.

Los Angeles museum-goers at last have an ongoing opportunity to enjoy one of our nation’s most important collections of art from Africa, Asia, the Pacific, and the Americas in Intersections: World Arts, Local Lives, which will feature approximately 250 of the finest objects from the Fowler’s collections in a long-term exhibition that celebrates the richness of world arts and considers the roles these works of art play in peoples’ lives.

Although they are scattered throughout the exhibit, there are a number of artifacts from Southeast Asia (Burma, Philippines, Indonesia, and Malaysia) including ancestor figures, puppets, masks, and other sculptures.  There is also a five-minutes film on Indonesia: “Sisilia Sii, Weaver” which focuses on ikat weaving techniques on the island of Flores.
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