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Scandals pushed Pinoys to run to church – analyst

Posted On 2014 Oct 30
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President Benigno S. Aquino III greets His Eminence Orlando Cardinal Quevedo following the Thanksgiving Mass in celebration of his elevation to the College of Cardinals at the Immaculate Conception Cathedral in Quezon Avenue, Cotabato City on Tuesday (March 11). Cardinal Quevedo received his red hat and ring from Pope Francis during a solemn consistory at the St. Peter’s Basilica on February 22, 2014. (MNS photo)

President Benigno S. Aquino III greets His Eminence Orlando Cardinal Quevedo following the Thanksgiving Mass in celebration of his elevation to the College of Cardinals at the Immaculate Conception Cathedral in Quezon Avenue, Cotabato City on Tuesday (March 11). Cardinal Quevedo received his red hat and ring from Pope Francis during a solemn consistory at the St. Peter’s Basilica on February 22, 2014. (MNS photo)

MANILA (Mabuhay) – The scandals that rocked the different government institutions paved the way for the Church to gain more trust from Filipinos, an analyst said.

San Beda Graduate School of Law Dean Fr. Ranhilio Aquino told Radio Veritas, “Political branches of government saw their trust ratings go down, in particular the Office of the President and House of Representatives – that leaves the people with nothing to trust. The most organized social institution in the Philippines they turn to [therefore] is the Church.”

According to the 2014 Philippine Trust Index presented on by EON Incorporated on Tuesday, the Catholic Church is the most trusted institution here.

The survey showed that 75% of the general public and 66% of the informed public trust the Catholic Church “very much.”

The same survey showed that the “biggest losers” were the Office of the President and the Senate.

General public trust in the Office of the President dropped to 16% from 28% in 2012. Its trust rating from the informed public also dropped to 15% from 24%.

The Senate, on the other hand, had a 7% trust rating from 15% in 2012. Trust from the informed public was at 4%, down from 13%.

Aquino also believes that the Catholic church has been vocal on issues that affected the public.

“The Church never grew silent on social issues. The church made itself heard, but it gave responsible statements. Even if it did not side with one particular political structure, it gave out statements that showed the church principles,” Aquino said.

He also noted that 2016 is nearing. He said people would want to side with an institution that can espouse truth.

“They know that statements from the politicians will be self-serving…and yet society cannot be adrift, they need to trust someone – an institution they would want to listen to.”

He urged the Catholic church not to lose this trust.

“We once lost this trust, and it took time to earn it once more,” he added.

In a separate statement, Catholic Bishops Conference of the Philippines secretary general Fr. Marvin Mejia said: “It’s consoling that the Catholic Church still has place in our nation. And our leaders, pastors, and lay leaders have done something good and these are being recognized.”

He said the survey, nonetheless, is not something to brag about.

“The Church are doing things that are not for recognition and acceptance. We have a higher purpose, which is to serve God and His people,” he said. (MNS)

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