(818) 552-4503

CAAP: Pilot error likely caused Cebu Pacific mishap

Comment: Off
Civil Aviation Authority Deputy Director General John Andrews displays a photo from his notepad showing the grass that spilled on the runway, indicating the landing made by a Cebu Pacific Airbus A320 passenger plane which overshot the runway Saturday at Davao city International Airport in southern Philippines, during a news conference Tuesday, June 4, 2013 in Manila, Philippines. Philippine aviation authorities said Tuesday they were investigating Cebu Pacific pilots and crew who left passengers waiting some 15 minutes before deploying emergency slides on the plane that overshot the runway and landed on its nose.  (MNS photo)

Civil Aviation Authority Deputy Director General John Andrews displays a photo from his notepad showing the grass that spilled on the runway, indicating the landing made by a Cebu Pacific Airbus A320 passenger plane which overshot the runway Saturday at Davao city International Airport in southern Philippines, during a news conference Tuesday, June 4, 2013 in Manila, Philippines. Philippine aviation authorities said Tuesday they were investigating Cebu Pacific pilots and crew who left passengers waiting some 15 minutes before deploying emergency slides on the plane that overshot the runway and landed on its nose. (MNS photo)

MANILA, June 4 (Mabuhay) — The Civil Aviation Authority of the Philippines says the Cebu Pacific mishap at the Davao International Airport on Sunday was likely caused by pilot error.

CAAP deputy director general John Andrews says based on their initial findings there was nothing wrong with the plane’s engine.

He adds another Cebu Pacific aircraft was able to land safely just two minutes before the accident.

The plane’s flight data recorder will be sent to Singapore for analysis.

“We have now the evidence to state for a fact that pilot error was involved. It’s not the plane. No problem with the plane,” Andrews said.

“The right wheel touched down very, very close to the edge of the grass portion. It traveled only a few hundred meters before it hit the grassy portion, that is why passengers said they felt a strong vibration. During all this time, the captain had engines in full reverse, that’s why a lot of debris was thrown toward the runway… So I will assume both engines were damaged because of this,” Andrews said.

Cebu Pacific was given until 7 a.m. to remove the damaged plane from the runway, but the airline is still struggling to do so.

CAAP wants to take over the clearing operations but it cannot do so without consent from the airline.

“There is a law that says you must have the consent of the owner to move the aircraft. Until this law is repealed, removed, we will not have the right to remove the aircraft,” Andrews said.

Cebu Pacific spokesperson Candice Iyog, meanwhile, insists their pilots are experienced and are considered veterans in the industry.

On Monday evening, Cebu Pacific chief executive officer Lance Gokongwei apologized for the inconvenience caused by the Cebu Pacific plane that is still blocking the Davao airport’s runway. The Davao airport remains closed as of Tuesday morning. (MNS)

About the Author

Related Posts