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BIR: No tax on relief goods for ‘Yolanda’ victims

Philippine and U.S. military personnel carry boxes of water to be deployed via airlift by the U.S. Air Force to victims of super typhoon Haiyan, in Manila November 13, 2013. Philippine officials have been overwhelmed by Haiyan, one of the strongest typhoons on record, which tore through the central Philippines on Friday and flattened Tacloban, coastal capital of Leyte province where officials had feared 10,000 people died, many drowning in a tsunami-like wall of seawater (MNS photo)

Philippine and U.S. military personnel carry boxes of water to be deployed via airlift by the U.S. Air Force to victims of super typhoon Haiyan, in Manila November 13, 2013. Philippine officials have been overwhelmed by Haiyan, one of the strongest typhoons on record, which tore through the central Philippines on Friday and flattened Tacloban, coastal capital of Leyte province where officials had feared 10,000 people died, many drowning in a tsunami-like wall of seawater (MNS photo)

MANILA, Nov 14 (Mabuhay) – The Bureau of Internal Revenue (BIR) has clarified that relief goods, from here and abroad, intended for victims of super typhoon ‘Yolanda’ will be spared from taxes as long as they are coursed through the government or accredited foundations.

The BIR said donor’s tax and import duties and other taxes will not be slapped on relief goods, if they are coursed through government agencies, such as the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD), or accredited private foundations.

The government will shoulder the value-added tax on these donations.

Aid in-kind continues to pour in for ‘Yolanda’ victims in the Visayas from foreign countries and organizations, as well as local groups and foundations as survivors scramble for food, water and basic necessities.

Some 10 million individuals were affected by the typhoon, with over 2,300 deaths, thus far, according to the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC).

On Wednesday, Customs chief Ruffy Biazon denied that donated relief goods from abroad are being taxed by the Bureau of Customs, which allegedly caused delays in its distribution to typhoon-hit areas.(MNS)

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